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Contributions by Jennifer Moses:

“Exhibit A”

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It’s the 2019 Switcheroo! We received amazing, varied, inspiring submissions of writing in response to Jennifer Moses’s painting—now we’re thrilled to present the final winning collaboration.

Collaborators’ Q&A: Artist Jennifer Moses: After this pairing the painting has more layers of meaning for me and it makes me wonder if I would have come up with a similar image had I been responding first to Kaylen’s writing… I might have. Writer Kaylen Baker: I may have gone to a darker place with the words. Or rather, my narrator is at odds with what she’s looking at, which creates a dissonance between emotion and reality.

Artist Jennifer Moses lives and paints in Boston, where she is currently represented by the Kingston Gallery. She is a Professor at the University of New Hampshire. Kaylen Baker is a writer and translator. Originally from Hawai’i, she graduated from Columbia University’s MFA program and now lives in Paris, where she’s at work on a book of fiction.

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“Afterlife: Ursus Arctos”

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Collaborators’ Q&A: Poet Susanna Mishcler: The faint images of bears seem to both liquefy and radiate from the center of the piece. This makes the bear figures very mythic and shape-shifting. Artist Jennifer Moses: I love the poem line by line and the last line the best. There is so much imagery, color, and good words to bounce off of.

Poet Susanna Mishler’s collection of poems, Termination Dust (Boreal Books/Red Hen Press), was a finalist for a 2015 Lambda Literary Award. Artist Jennifer Moses is a painter living in Boston.

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“Corazón con parque y niños”

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Collaborators’ Q&A: Translator Keith Ekiss: This is “visual Odio.” The lines and colors flow and don’t appear to have any point of origin or termination, they curl and drift like smoke or blood. Artist Jennifer Moses: Oddly enough the poem in English translation evoked an abstract response conversely the Spanish translation seemed suited for a figurative narrative approach.

Poet Eunice Odio (1919-1974) is considered the leading Costa Rican poet of the twentieth century. Translator Keith Ekiss is the author of Pima Road Notebook (New Issues Poetry & Prose, 2010) and the translator of The Fire’s Journey (Tavern Books, 2013) by Eunice Odio.  Artist Jennifer Moses is a painter living in Boston.

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“Heart with Park and Children”

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Collaborators’ Q&A: Translator Keith Ekiss: Maybe I’m romanticizing the original Spanish, but Odio’s poem seems more mysterious, more secretive than my translation. This is a shy poem. Artist Jennifer Moses: I think trying to approximate a sensation or image in relation to language is similar to a translation.

Poet Eunice Odio (1919-1974) is considered the leading Costa Rican poet of the twentieth century. Translator Keith Ekiss is the author of Pima Road Notebook (New Issues Poetry & Prose, 2010) and the translator of The Fire’s Journey (Tavern Books, 2013) by Eunice Odio.  Artist Jennifer Moses is a painter living in Boston.

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“Landing Under Water, I See Roots”

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Collaborators’ Q&A: Artist Jennifer Moses: I was inspired to think about the undercurrents of things and how there is a private embedded subtext in our brains in our chests. Poet Annie Finch: It surprises me to be reminded that “Landing Under Water, I See Roots” is, after all, a poem about the possibility of connecting with people, about the spectrum of human connection.

Poet Annie Finch’s newest book, Spells: New and Selected Poems, is just out from Wesleyan University Press. Artist Jennifer Moses is a painter living in Boston. She is also a professor of art at the University of New Hampshire

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“2011 Haiku Year-in-Review”

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Collaborators’ Q&A, Season by Season Winter: Earthquake/Tsunami in Japan Once you saw the art for your season, did it cause you to see your haiku in a different light? Poet Peter Kline: I was moved by the dramatic simplicity of Kara Searcy’s design, which emphasized the individual human cost of the Japanese tsunami while also insisting on the impersonality of the destructive forces. I was surprised at how closely her vision of the tragedy matched …

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“2010 Haiku Year-in-Review”

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Collaborators’ Q&A, Season by Season Poem Subject: The earthquakes in Haiti and Chile; Art Subject: The death of J.D. Salinger Once you saw the art for your season, did it cause you to see your haiku in a different light? Poet Anastassia Cafatti Mac-Niven: No, it didn’t do any difference to my haiku. But now that I think about it, the art suits my haiku because it has something to do with death, and the haiku …

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“Aphasia” (Laux & Moses)

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Collaborators’ Q&A What did you think an artist would pick up on from your poem? Poet Dorianne Laux: I wasn’t sure. There are so many objects in the poem: the blue pitcher, the glass of water, the pillow, the sky in the window, pink roses, the tissue box, her buttons. I guess I thought it might be one of those. And yet, it seems that Jennifer Moses saw that much less visual but maybe more evocative “dark …

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