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Contributions by Jennifer Moses:

“Afterlife: Ursus Arctos”

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Collaborators’ Q&A What did you think an artist would pick up on from your poem? Poet Susanna Mishler: I tried not to think about it too much. There’s a wide spectrum of artists, styles, and mediums that have appeared on Broadsided collaborations. I had no idea if the poem was in the hands of a photographer, a painter, a sculptor, a mixed media artist, or who. What inspires you in this poem? Artist Jennifer Moses: I …

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“Corazón con parque y niños”

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Collaborators’ Q&A What is it like to see both visual responses to the poem? Translator Keith Ekiss: This is “visual Odio.” The lines and colors flow and don’t appear to have any point of origin or termination, they curl and drift like smoke or blood. The visual arts were important to Odio and she wrote with great insight and verve on artists she admired like Leonora Carrington and Remedios Varo. My first thought on seeing …

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“Heart with Park and Children”

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Collaborators’ Q&A What is it like to see both visual responses to the poem? Translator Keith Ekiss: This is “visual Odio.” The lines and colors flow and don’t appear to have any point of origin or termination, they curl and drift like smoke or blood. The visual arts were important to Odio and she wrote with great insight and verve on artists she admired like Leonora Carrington and Remedios Varo. My first thought on seeing …

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“Landing Under Water, I See Roots”

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Collaborators’ Q&A What did you think an artist would pick up on from your poem? Poet Annie Finch: I thought they’d pick up on the imagery of trees and roots. What inspires you in this poem? Artist Jennifer Moses: I was inspired to think about the undercurrents of things and how there is a private embedded subtext in our brains in our chests. It drives us and runs deep. Did either visual artist refract any element of …

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“2011 Haiku Year-in-Review”

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Collaborators’ Q&A, Season by Season Winter: Earthquake/Tsunami in Japan Once you saw the art for your season, did it cause you to see your haiku in a different light? Poet Peter Kline: I was moved by the dramatic simplicity of Kara Searcy’s design, which emphasized the individual human cost of the Japanese tsunami while also insisting on the impersonality of the destructive forces. I was surprised at how closely her vision of the tragedy matched …

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“2010 Haiku Year-in-Review”

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Collaborators’ Q&A, Season by Season Poem Subject: The earthquakes in Haiti and Chile; Art Subject: The death of J.D. Salinger Once you saw the art for your season, did it cause you to see your haiku in a different light? Poet Anastassia Cafatti Mac-Niven: No, it didn’t do any difference to my haiku. But now that I think about it, the art suits my haiku because it has something to do with death, and the haiku …

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“Aphasia” (Laux & Moses)

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Collaborators’ Q&A What did you think an artist would pick up on from your poem? Poet Dorianne Laux: I wasn’t sure. There are so many objects in the poem: the blue pitcher, the glass of water, the pillow, the sky in the window, pink roses, the tissue box, her buttons. I guess I thought it might be one of those. And yet, it seems that Jennifer Moses saw that much less visual but maybe more evocative “dark …

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