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Contributions by Kate Baird:

“El Silencio” / “The Silence”

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Collaborators’ Q&A: Do you see an overlap between the act of translation and the act of responding visually to a piece of literature? Artist Kate Baird: Sure.  You’re taking something made using one system of meaning and pulling it into another, emphasizing some parts and losing others.  Hopefully you’re keeping some of what animated the original piece and also creating something that has meaning of its own. If this broadside were a type of weather, what would it be? Translator Rowena Hill: A brooding afternoon, fine but with a change not too far off.

Poet Igor Barreto was born in San Fernando de Apure, on the plains of Venezuela, in 1952. Poet, critic, publisher and leader of literature workshops. He has published ten books of poems. Translator Rowena Hill taught English Literature at the Universidad de Los Andes in Mérida, Venezuela, where she has been based for more than forty years. She has published five books of poems in Spanish and has translated into English some of Venezuela’s best known poets. Kate Baird is a visual artist and the museum educator at the Springfield Art Museum in Springfield, Missouri.

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“To Remain in Perhaps”

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Poet Jennifer K. Sweeney: I thought there might be some interpretation of impermanence, a kind of blurriness in the flux.  Artist Kate Baird: I was interested in representing the passage of time through stacking, like sediment.  Also the material properties of the rice paper roof…

Collaborators: Jennifer K. Sweeney is the author of three poetry collections and recipient of the James Laughlin Award. She lives in California’s Inland Empire where she teaches privately and at the University of Redlands. Kate Baird is a visual artist and the museum educator at the Springfield Art Museum in Springfield, Missouri.  She is also a founder of Placeworks, a multi-disciplinary arts program for rural schools

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“The Other Side”

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Collaborators’ Q&A: What surprised you about this collaborative piece? Poet Matthew Thorburn: I’m happily surprised that my little poem inspired another artist to create something beautiful and engaging. I think as writers we always imagine (or hope for) readers who will be drawn into our work and feel some kind of response to it—that’s what I hope for, at least. To see that response expressed in another creative work is an amazing and humbling experience. Artist Kate Baird: I think I registered the title for the first time when looking at the broadside. I had surely read it before, but I guess I’d sort of mentally skipped over it. I think I got lost in the time element of the poem, and seeing the title brought me back to the space element of it.

Poet Matthew Thorburn lives in New York City. He is the author of six collections of poetry, including Dear Almost (LSU, 2016) and the chapbook A Green River in Spring (Autumn House, 2015), which includes this poem. Artist Kate Baird is the museum educator at the Springfield Art Museum.

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“Two Potatoes” / “Dwa ziemniaki”

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Collaborators’ Q&A: Artist Kate Baird: Yes—I think that, generally speaking, making images is a form of translation that takes an idea/intuition/thought and turns it into a material thing. Translator Piotr Florczyk: Anna Świrszczyńska’s work teaches us to say less and mean more while we aim to make sense of ourselves and the world we live in. Translation, the ultimate act of close reading, helps me be a better reader and poet.

Poet Anna Świrszczyńska is a significant Polish poet and playwright of the postwar period. She lived and wrote in Warsaw during the Nazi occupation. Translator Piotr Florczyk is a poet, essayist, and translator. He lives in Santa Monica. Artist Kate Baird lives in Springfield, MO. She is a painter and works as teaching artist with Placeworks, an arts outreach program for rural schools.

 

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“Majestic Prayers of Bangor”

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Collaborators’ Q&A: Poet Sean Prentiss: … What I love about this idea of pairing a writer and an artist is the way the two genres push against each other, talk to each other in unique and unexpected ways. It’s about receiving what I don’t expect. Receiving what I could never create alone. Artist Kate Baird: I was meaning to emphasize the grimness and dinginess of where she was coming from. Now that I see the poem and image together, I feel like the image underscores her energy and drive more than it does the lack of opportunity in the town. I think the poem/image ends up having a more positive sort of energy than I had envisioned, but I’m kind of glad about that. Because I’m rooting for the girl.

Poet Sean Prentiss was once a boy who after high school drove white-knuckled out of Bangor. He still returns some summer nights to its long wooden bars (and chilled bottles of Yuengling lager). He is also the editor of a forthcoming anthology on the craft of creative nonfiction, The Far Edges of the Fourth Genre. Artist Kate Baird lives in Springfield, MO. She is a painter and works as teaching artist with Placeworks, an arts outreach program for rural schools.

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“2010 Haiku Year-in-Review”

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NOTE: Inspired by Carrier’s Addresses and a deep commitment to public art, the HYIR is a special feature that debuted this year at Broadsided. Four artists created work in response to an event that for them dominated a season of 2010. We placed an open call for submissions of haiku that did the same. The art and the poems selected as finalists were posted online, and we asked you to vote on the winning combinations.

Poet Anastassia Cafatti Mac-Niven is a 12-year-old girl from Chile, and a sixth grader at the International School Nido De Aguilas. Caleb Brown is an artist. He works on software interfaces and reads and walks and is going to make graphic novels someday. Poet Andy Young is the co-editor of Meena, a bilingual Arabic-English literary journal. Artist Cheryl Gross writes: “When asked about my work, I always equate it with creating an environment transforming my inner thoughts into reality.” Poet Marsh Muirhead lives on the Mississippi River near Bemidji, Minnesota. Artist Kate Baird looks for the distances and differences between places through drawing and painting. Writer Sam Ferrigno writes: “I’m 22-year-old student at the University of Connecticut studying journalism and English. I took my first creative writing class in the Fall of 2009 just as something fun to do.” Artist Jennifer Moses is a painter living in Boston.

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“One Lineage of Ice, Ravened”

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Collaborators’ Q&A: Artist Kate Baird: I like how it goes from short, personal episode to mythic sweep. And I worry about ice disappearing. Poet Jari Thymian: First, I had the definite feeling that Kate placed the ravens on the shoulders of every person. I see the shoulders, the glaciers, the ghosts of ravens. Then I saw all the colors and layers of ice. Until then, I don’t think I consciously saw that I had layers of ice (numbered stanzas) in the poem.

Poet Jari Thymian’s poetry has appeared in Simply Haiku, Ekphrasis, The Christian Science Monitor, The Pedestal Magazine, The Progenitor, ByLine, and in various anthologies. Artist Kate Baird looks for the distances and differences between places through drawing and painting. She received an MFA from the University of Chicago in 2005 and currently works as a teaching artist at the Guggenheim Museum and the Kentler International Drawing Space.

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“Interstate”

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Collaborators’ Q&A: Poet Brian Hendrickson: Kate’s art reminds me of a dream-gate one might pass through while falling asleep at the wheel, so I immediately recognized the potential for conversation between her work and this particular poem. Artist Kate Baird: I think the drawing looks sort of feminine and delicate—not really intentionally, but it looks that way to me—and the poem is very forceful, violent in places, and in a male voice. That surprised me, but I was glad about it.

Artist Kate Baird looks for the distances and differences between places through drawing and painting. She received an MFA from the University of Chicago in 2005 and currently works as a teaching artist at the Guggenheim Museum and the Kentler International Drawing Space. Poet Brian Hendrickson, a Florida-born ex-Alaskan currently residing in High Point, North Carolina, teaches English and reading at Guilford Technical Community College.

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“Dear Wallet”

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Collaborators’ Q&A: Poet Aaron Plasek: …A fingerprint is the proof we leave behind of our presence, it’s what we leave while grasping others and also a means of identification, criminal or otherwise. Artist Kate Baird: I liked the economy of it—there are things implied about at least three different relationships (more if you count relationships with the wallet) and two generations in a very short poem. Even being so succinct, it feels very complete.

Poet Aaron Plasek: After studying literature and physics at Drake University, Aaron Plasek edited The Dimebag of Poetry and curated the Et Cet*er*a Reading Series in Des Moines, Iowa, and later earned an MFA in Writing from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. Artist Kate Baird, a native of Springfield, MO, now lives in New York City where she paints and reads as much as possible.

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“Visitation”

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Artist Kate Baird: The smoke imagery attracted me to the poem—I thought it would be fun to try to draw smoke, which is a substance that is there and not there at the same time… Poet Noel Sloboda: I also really like how the ascending smoke runs against the text, slowing down the read and teasing out different moods from the poem.

Collaborators: Noel Sloboda teaches at Penn State York and serves as dramaturg for the Harrisburg Shakespeare Festival. Kate Baird lives in New York City where she paints and reads as much as possible.

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“Bird’s Eye”

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Poet Amanda Rachelle Warren: Something in the angles of Kate’s painting, “Bird’s Eye,” looks broken, fractured… or perhaps fractal, kaleidoscopic! Artist Kate Baird: I had been thinking of a “bird’s eye view” as a figure of speech referring to a particular perspective, but I never gave much thought to actual birds.

Collaborators: Amanda Rachelle Warren is a displaced Appalachian currently working as both a Part-Time Instructor and the Assistant to the Dean of the Graduate College at Western Michigan University. Kate Baird is a painter and works as a teaching artist in Springfield, MO.

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“Eros”

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Poet H.D. (1886 – 1961) was a poet, novelist, and memoirist. She was part of London’s bohemian culture and the first woman to be granted the American Academy of Arts and Letters medal. “Eros” is excerpted from a longer poem.

Artist Kate Baird, a native of Springfield, MO, now lives in New York City where she paints and reads as much as possible.

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“Forgiveness”

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Poet Richard Hoffman‘s work, both prose and verse, has appeared in Agni, Ascent, Harvard Review, Hudson Review, The Literary Review, Poetry, Shenandoah, Witness and elsewhere, as well as in several anthologies. He is the author of the poetry collection Without Paradise (Cedar Hill Books.) 

Artist Kate Baird, a native of Springfield, MO, now lives in New York City where she paints and reads as much as possible.

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“Mathematician Watching Moths at an All-Night Gas Station”

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Poet Paul McCormick worked for many years as a clammer on the Great South Bay. He now writes literary passages for standardized tests. His recent poems appear or are forthcoming in Denver Quarterly, The Iowa Review, Verse, Fence, Barrow Street, Conduit, Conjunctions and other journals. He lives in Huntington, NY.

Artist Kate Baird, a native of Springfield, MO, now lives in New York City where she paints and reads as much as possible.

 

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“Epithalamion”

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Poet G.C. Waldrep books of poems are Goldbeater’s Skin (Center for Literary Publishing, 2003) and Disclamor (forthcoming from BOA Editions, 2007). “Epithalamion” originally appeared in the Black Warrior Review.

Artist Kate Baird, a native of Springfield, MO, now lives in New York City where she paints and reads as much as possible.

 

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