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Contributions by Yuko Adachi:

“The Horse of Higashi-Matsushima”

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Collaborators’ Q&A: Poet Hugh Martin: The piece of artwork is a small, yet beautiful and important reminder that we need to keep Japan in our thoughts. Artist Yuko Adachi: I wanted to create an image that is positive, gentle and healing for Japanese people and to those who purchase this print… The suffering that Japan is experiencing aches my heart to the point of numbness but I want to thank you for your support and love that you are sending to Japan. We feel it!

Artist Yuko Adachi is a Tokyo-born artist who was raised in Japan, Paris, London, and the United States of America. In 2007, her work was awarded best in painting for “Healing Power of Art” by Manhattan Art International. Poet Hugh Martin is a veteran of the Iraq war and a graduate of Muskingum University. He now attends the MFA program at Arizona State University.

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“How Love Heals”

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Collaborators’ Q&A: What do you think is the role of art in regards to real-world, real-time events? In other words, what makes a “successful” occasional or political piece of writing or art? Poet Deborah Fried-Rubin: I hope art helps us make sense of the emotional content of “world” events, and shows us how to relate in our private capacities to make a cumulative impact. Because everything is ultimately reducible to millions upon millions of individuals, the best “political” poem is a personal one, with heart in it. Artist Yuko Adachi: An agile creative response with a purpose to the event that opens up our mind and willingness to make an effort to spread what we created and talk about it.

Artist Yuko Adachi is a Tokyo-born artist who was raised in Japan, Paris, London, and the United States of America. Today, she lives and works in Boston. Writer Deborah Fried-Rubin is a second year graduate student in the Queens College MFA program, pursuing an interest in poetry after many years of practicing law.

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“Replying to the SubPrefect Zhang”

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Collaborators’ Q&A: Translator Dawn McGuire: Yuko Adachi foregrounded the fisherman, which was a surprise, and very charming. It made me hear the song as an element of the poem that lingered on after the reading—nice! Artist Yuko Adachi: I did not want to overshadow the beauty of poem with my image I create, so I try to stay imaginative just like the poem without too much complication yet follow its depth of expression in simplicity.

Translator Dawn McGuire was born in Grayson, Kentucky, in the foothills of the Appalachians. “By day,” she is a San Francisco neurologist focusing on complications of HIV/AIDS. McGuire studied Chinese at Princeton University and Middlebury College. McGuire believes there is no such thing as “the” translation of a Tang Dynasty poem. Yuko Adachi is a Tokyo-born artist who was raised in Japan, Paris, London, and the United States of America. In 2007, her work was awarded best in painting for “Healing Power of Art” by Manhattan Art International. Today, she lives and works in Boston. Poet Wang Wei was the “Poet Buddha” of the extraordinary Tang Dynasty, when poetry was the center of Chinese cultural life.

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“The Dry Tortugas”

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Collaborators’ Q&A: Poet Molly Fisk: I had always thought about that poem in terms of color and loss: what my grandparents lost in deciding not to build that house, and what my grandmother lost when my grandfather died, soon after, and what I’ve lost since she died, because we were very close. Refracted through Yuko’s eyes, the poem takes on a smoother sense for me, a feeling maybe that lots remains when something is lost, and that’s how it should be. Water moving and changing, constantly inconstant. Artist Yuko Adachi: I think it is romantic to see how art and literature from two different artists come together as one piece and they compliment each others’ work.

Poet Molly Fisk is the author of Listening to Winter, and Salt Water Poems, a commentator for NPR and community station KVMR-FM Nevada City, and teaches at U.C. Davis Extension and the Sierra Nevada Cancer Center. Yuko Adachi is a Tokyo-born artist who was raised in Japan, Paris, London, and the United States of America. In 2007, her work was awarded best in painting for “Healing Power of Art” by Manhattan Art International. Today, she lives and works in Boston.

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