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Contributions by Emily Dickinson:

“The Bustle in a House”

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Why this poem? An answer by artist Jenny Bevill Not surprisingly with Dickinson, it’s a sad story. My mom died in May after a short but intense and completely unexpected battle with cancer. I’d been trying to write thank you notes to all the people who helped us out during her illness but I just hadn’t been able to do it. I was overwhelmed with not knowing how to express my feelings. Then I read …

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“It was not Death, for I stood up”

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Collaborators’ Q&A: Artist Elizabeth Terhune: Many things strike me about this poem. The inverted checklist structure (it was not this, because . . .). The slow pace. Her brilliant language, “for all the Bells/put out their Tongues, for Noon.” The stunning conclusion: “Chaos — stopless — cool” always shocks me.

Artist Elizabeth Terhune has exhibited widely throughout the United States. Her most recent shows include a two-person show at Feast Gallery in Saratoga Springs, NY, a four-person show at Metaphor Contemporary Art in Brooklyn, NY, and a one-person exhibition at the Lake George Arts Project, Lake George, NY.

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“Wild nights”

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Collaborators’ Q&A: Artist Meghan Keane: For me, art is making something transform from what is expected to what is unexpected and complex and beautiful (even if it’s dark and haunting); that process is tactile, using the body as a tool for manipulating materials.

Artist Meghan Keane is a teaching artist at Kentler International Drawing Space and a visiting alumni artist at the Brooklyn College art department printshop.

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“I never hear the word ‘escape'”

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Collaborators’ Q&A: Artist Elizabeth Terhune: Like many people, I respond to Dickinson’s incredible compression, her inventiveness. In this case, I particularly liked how the poem opens up at the end (by quieting down a bit?). Also, her wildly fun sense of image and language…It is both intensely personal, her vulnerability is felt, but also, with the reference to “prisons broad,” connects to circumstances beyond herself. It’s a wonderful poem to have in one’s head.

Artist Elizabeth Terhune has exhibited widely throughout the United States. Her most recent shows include a two-person show at Feast Gallery in Saratoga Springs, NY, a four-person show at Metaphor Contemporary Art in Brooklyn, NY, and a one-person exhibition at the Lake George Arts Project, Lake George, NY.

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