Open
Subcribe to Our Newsletter

Contributions by Douglas Culhane:

“Handkerchief”

Posted on • Words by • Art by

Note: This broadside is part of our annual translation special feature in which we feature two broadsides—one by a poet writing in a language indigenous to the Americas. Collaborators’ Q&A Do you see an overlap between the act of translation and the act of responding visually to a piece of literature? Artist Douglas Culhane: Both involve interpretation and recreation. Both require a fidelity to the original as well as a commitment to the truth and …

Tagged: ,


“It Is”

Posted on • Words by • Art by

Collaborators’ Q&A What did you think an artist would pick up on from your poem? Poet Suzanne Marie Hopcroft: I think I hoped and felt that an artist would pick up on the sense of movement and energy in the poem—that it would be communicable even in an ostensibly static image—and I was right! All of the fundamental concrete elements of the poem are there in Douglas’s piece: the train, the red glove, the blueness of …

Tagged:


“April and Silence”

Posted on • Words by • Art by

Collaborators’ Q&A What is it like to see both visual responses to the poem? Does reading it in English versus Swedish provoke different feelings in you? Artist Douglas Culhane: The visual repsonses couldn’t be more different—which is good. Interestingly neither of us included specific imagery from the poem (yellow flowers, a violin). Tranströmer is a poet I really admire and working on this project is the first time I had read his work in the original …

Tagged: , ,


“Extirpation”

Posted on • Words by • Art by

Collaborators’ Q&A What did you think an artist would pick up on from your poem? Poet Keith Ekiss: I hoped the artist might pick up on a sense of absence and loss. Something’s missing in this landscape, which for many years has been the home of the Pima, that would still be there, if it weren’t for the damming and diverting of the Gila River in Arizona. What inspires you in this poem? Artist Douglas Culhane: The …

Tagged: ,


“Yard Work”

Posted on • Words by • Art by

Collaborators’ Q&A What did you think an artist would pick up on from your poem? Poet Ryan J Browne: I imagined the activities in the poem, of the officers, the dogs, and the inmates, would be the focus of the artwork, because those are what most people—myself included—find provocative about prisons. The bifurcation of the world inside, and the resulting interactions, isolations, and overlaps, are fascinating, terrifying, humanizing. What inspires you in this poem? Artist …

Tagged:


“Neighborhood Watch”

Posted on • Words by • Art by

Collaborators’ Q&A What inspired you to “dibs” this poem? Artist Douglas Culhane: There is an openness to this poem both visually and textually. It conveys that sense of thoughts taking shape just as the words appear on the page—something only poetry can do. Also, the ants. Did the visual artist refract any element of the poem that made you see the poem differently? Poet Anjali Khosla: Wow, the ants are big on the page! I suppose I …

Tagged: , , ,


“Edison in Love”

Posted on • Words by • Art by

Poet Robin Ekiss is a former Stegner Fellow in Poetry at Stanford. Her work appears or is forthcoming in AGNI, POETRY, The Kenyon Review, The Gettysburg Review, The New England Review, and elsewhere. She lives in San Francisco. “Edison in Love” first appeared in Poetry, October 2005. Artist Douglas Culhane works in sculpture and drawing. He has exhibited in New York and New England. See more of his work at www.douglasculhane.com. Image: Ink on paper, …

Tagged: , , ,